Should Pluto be a Planet?

After reading the title, you are probably thinking that this isn't an important matter and we have better things to be discussing on The Hub. However, I do think this is important for people to know. It could cause controversy and arguements but here is my opinion.

I could just say this: I don't think Pluto should be a planet, full stop. But I think this question is deeper than that. People used to and still are argueing about this so if it wasn't important why are we still talking about it? It has clearly caused people to think a lot and do a lot of reasoning and open-mindedness, two important BNC skills. This was, however, talked about more in the 20th century and very early 21st century. Pluto has been considered a dwarf planet so some people just leave it their but I want to think more deeply and closely.

In 1930, Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh and it was immediately considered a planet (the ninth from the sun). But then, around 1992, lots of similar-sized objects were found in the Kuiper Belt - a region of space beyond Neptune's orbit. This made some people question whether it was a planet or not but it wasn't discussed that much. But then, in 2005, a new object was found that was 27% bigger than Pluto, this is now known has Eris. It made people think that if Pluto was a planet and Eris was 27% bigger, Eris would have to be a planet, as well. I know that it isn't just the size that makes a planet a planet but it is very important to decide whether a planet is a planet. In consequence, Pluto was named a dwarf planet along with Eris and currently, they are both that.

However, people still talk about how Pluto or Eris should be a planet and that we should reconsider whether they are planets or not. Like I said at the start, I don't think Pluto should be a planet nor Eris as they are too small.

succinct_leaves

Information found at: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pluto.

Comments (21)

  • tom Tom @ the BNC
    12 Nov 2019

    The range of opinions on Pluto is fascinating to read. Thank you for bringing this to our attention, succinct_leaves. What makes them 'too' small - what standard are you measuring this by?

    Reply to this comment
  • Braiswick Primary School spirited_insect | Braiswick Primary School
    12 Nov 2019

    I think this is a good post because yes, you have used good reasoning. To be honest, I think it should not be a planet, but a dwarf planet because that describes it as a small planet. Describing as the word 'dwarf planet' indicates it as small and miniature-sized and people will get the idea that it is small. Dwarf planet has upgraded its meaning over time in my opinion. I think this because dwarf planet would probably mean 'small planet' but then it evolved into 'almost a planet'. You still get the idea it is small, it is just that its meaning has changed a lot overtime.
    I also get that when Pluto was discovered it was immediately considered a planet as they had just discovered it and probably didn't think about its size. I also think comparing the two planets (Eris and Pluto) was a good idea because now you can actually say that Eris could be a planet if you can compare the size.

    Reply to this comment
  • Ormiston Sudbury Academy free_iceberg | Ormiston Sudbury Academy
    12 Nov 2019

    I believe Pluto should be considered a planet. I don't think there should be a measurement to decide whether a planet is too small to be classed as either a planet or star as there could be different reasons why a planet may end up one day decreasing in size. On earth the temperature can affect the planets size if the earth cools the planet can contract making it slightly smaller, let’s say we one day decrease climate change that much that we end up reverting the Earth back in time causing the Earth’s temperature to suddenly drop using this theory the Earth may dramatically shrink in size, would the planet we call a home suddenly loose its status as a planet or would it later on be seen as a dwarf planet? Over the years there has been many debates whether Pluto is actually a planet, a dwarf planet or a star. As this answer keeps on changing it adds uncertainty of Pluto’s actual status even though in many schools it’s still on the curriculum as a dwarf planet some different researches seem to believe it’s a star unlike Nasa. NASA states Pluto has the same properties as other planets which would count it as a planet not a dwarf planet. NASA chief Jim Bridestien said earlier this year that Pluto was once again classed as a planet after being a dwarf planet for the last 13 years, he said "I am here to tell you, as the NASA Administrator, I believe Pluto should be a planet," he also recognised that "Some people have argued that in order to be a planet, you need to clear your orbit around the sun" and if that is the rule there going to base a planet on that all planets are “dwarf planets because there isn’t a planet that clears its entire orbit around the sun." After reading the full article helps back up my belief that Pluto is a planet.

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ the BNC
      free_iceberg's comment 13 Nov 2019

      Very good evidence here, free_iceberg. You've used the words of an expert to support the point you are making.

      Reply to this comment
    2. Braiswick Primary School succinct_leaves | Braiswick Primary School
      free_iceberg's comment 14 Nov 2019

      You said, to be classed as a planet or star, but it isn't the size that is neccesarily the difference betwenn these things. A planet is a celsestial body moving eliptically around a star, in our case, Earth moves around the sun, which is a star. A star is, however, a luminous ball of gas, mostly containing hydrogen and helium, held together by its own gravity. As you might know, there are more stars in the universe than grains of sand on Earth.

      succinct_leaves

      Reply to this comment
  • The Sherwood School curious_speech | The Sherwood School
    13 Nov 2019

    I think Pluto should be a planet and what’s the point of hveing Pluto in space carrying on it’s also a dwarf planet

    Reply to this comment
  • Phoenix-logo-250x250.jpg admirable_signature | Phoenix Primary School
    13 Nov 2019

    I believe that Pluto should be a Planet because,Pluto DOES orbit a star(our sun) and like our Ice giants/Jovian Planets Pluto consists of 98 percent of nitrogen ice and traces of methane and carbon dioxide. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) downgraded the status of Pluto to that of a dwarf planet because it did not meet the three criteria the IAU uses to define a full-sized planet. Essentially Pluto meets all the criteria except one- it “has not cleared its neighboring region of other objects.”So, the three criteria of the IAU for a full-sized planet are: It is in orbit around the Sun. It has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape). It has "cleared the neighborhood" around its orbit.The only reason Pluto is not classified a full planet anymore is that Pluto became a dwarf planet is because in 2006, scientists voted for the first time on the definition of a planet—and Pluto didn't make the cut. Like the other official worlds in our solar system, it orbits the sun and is massive enough that its own gravity makes it round.

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ the BNC
      admirable_signature's comment 13 Nov 2019

      Please could you always write in your own words, and if you are quoting from elsewhere make sure it is always in "speech marks" - thanks!

      Reply to this comment
  • St Marys Whitstable logo outspoken_meteor | St Mary's Catholic Primary School B
    13 Nov 2019

    I don't think Pluto should be a planet because there is a lot of dwarf planets that we haven't heard of.

    Reply to this comment
  • St Marys Whitstable logo outspoken_meteor | St Mary's Catholic Primary School B
    15 Nov 2019

    I also think it should a planet because its one of the best dwarf planets and it had been counted as a planet so long.

    Reply to this comment
  • Arnhem-Wharf-logo-250x250.jpg stellar_lion | Arnhem Wharf Primary School
    15 Nov 2019

    I think pluto should be a planet because it was once a part of our solar system and like you said there are many dwarf PLANETS that we have never even discovered, so who knows how to classify a planet?

    Reply to this comment
  • Allerton-logo-250x250.jpg reasoning_honeydew | Allerton High School
    15 Nov 2019

    This a very good post succinct_leaves, as it is about the well-debated subject of whether Pluto is a planet or not. In my opinion, Pluto does not deserve the title of a planet. Firstly, I think this because, as you stated, Eris is bigger than Pluto, but never named a planet. There are other dwarf planets such as Haumea and Makemake, that are not much smaller than Pluto but even after recent discovery, never named planets. Furthermore, the second reason that I believe Pluto is not a planet is that it doesn’t meet the criteria for a planet. Pluto may orbit the sun like the other planets, but it simply isn’t big enough to “clear its neighbourhood” which means to consume or force smaller objects away. Because of this, Pluto is not accepted as a planet, for it does not obtain the same properties as the other planets. Therefore, I believe the correct decision was made when Pluto was demoted to a dwarf planet. What are everyone else’s views on the subject?

    Reply to this comment
  • Evelyn-Street-logo-250x250.jpg loyal_peach | Evelyn Street Primary School
    16 Nov 2019

    Well done succinct_leaves. Pluto is a dwarf planet so it is not classed to be in the solar system of the planets because it is to small to be in the solar system

    Reply to this comment
  • Hillyfield School logo stupendous_market | Hillyfield Primary Academy
    16 Nov 2019

    No , it should not be a planet .

    Reply to this comment
    1. Braiswick Primary School succinct_leaves | Braiswick Primary School
      stupendous_market's comment 17 Nov 2019

      stupendous_market, why do you think this? You have to give reasons to back up your point.

      Reply to this comment
  • Braiswick Primary School venturous_snake | Braiswick Primary School
    19 Nov 2019

    i think it should be a planet because in the future maybe we would live on pluto and it would be a planet we live on

    Reply to this comment
    1. Braiswick Primary School succinct_leaves | Braiswick Primary School
      venturous_snake's comment 02 Dec 2019

      I do agree with: we could live on Pluto in the future. But that shouldn't change the status of Pluto from being a dwarf planet. We don't have to live on a planet. I know it sounds weird now, but it won't if we live on Pluto in the future. But also, that's the future, why should we be worrying about it now?

      Reply to this comment
  • The Sherwood School productive_eel | The Sherwood School
    22 Nov 2019

    I think that it doesn't matter if it is a planet or its not.Even it may now be considered as a dwarf planet scientist can still do research on it.If it becomes a planet or a dwarf planet Pluto and Eris should a respected asset of space exploration.

    Reply to this comment
  • The Sherwood School intrepid_coconut | The Sherwood School
    28 Nov 2019

    I do not think that it is not a planet as it's 1,188.3km however the earth's size is 6,371km. A dwarf planet is definitely a better term for it.

    Reply to this comment
  • Birchwood-logo-250x250.jpg honest_globe | Birchwood C of E Primary School
    29 Nov 2019

    i think that pluto should not be a planet because it is smaller than the moon.

    Reply to this comment
  • Hammond School logo courageous_fern | Hammond Junior School A
    04 Dec 2019

    I think that Pluto should not be considered a planet because it's radius is only 1,188.3km as well as it's surface area only being as big as 0.035 Earths.
    To be a planet it has to check off three criteria: " It is an orbit around the sun." " It has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape.)"and "It has cleared the neighborhood around it's orbit."
    In conclusion I believe that Pluto is too small to be a planet but is still very important.
    I got my information off Wikipedia.

    Reply to this comment

You must be logged in to post a comment