How far will china go to stamp out Hong Kong protests?

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How far will china go to stamp out Hong Kong protests?

So far, they have relied on the Hong Kong government to suppress the protest, but the banning of rallies, brutal police tactics, thug attacks, the arrests of high-profile activists and metro line closures have failed to dampen the unrest. Hong Kong government has hinted that it may invoke the emergency regulations ordinance which hands wide powers to the chief executive.

Why are people protesting in Hong Kong?

People in Hong Kong are protesting because Hong Kong and China are at war. China has taking over Hong Kong and has took away Hng Kong's country. The first protests began on June 9, with a total of 112 days of demonstration.

Thaks for listening

Comments (8)

  • Portobello-logo-250x250.jpg champion_grasshopper | Portobello High School
    01 Oct 2019

    We think the 1 country 2 system concept dose not work because China are opting out

    Reply to this comment
  • Streatham-Wells-logo-250x250.jpg conscientious_leopard | Streatham Wells Primary School
    02 Oct 2019

    where did you get this information and I am asking this because it puzzles me?

    Reply to this comment
  • Graveney-logo-250x250.jpg jazzed_iceberg | Graveney School
    02 Oct 2019

    China has to weigh up what it chooses to do. It can either back down and seem weak in front of its people and the rest of the world, obviously a situation it does not want to find its-self in, or it can have a repeat of Tiananmen square, thereby making themselves appear incredibly strong and further deterring a future chance of rebellion either from Hong Kong or even China if its people riot, but the problem with that would be (beyond the mass genocide) that it would leave China without its window to the rest of the world, and a large source of its income. The real question is how far it is willing to go to protect its pride.

    I (and I hope everyone else here) hope that it will choose to swallow its pride and not commit mass murder, but I cannot be sure that this will be its decision, given its track record...

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ the BNC
      jazzed_iceberg's comment 03 Oct 2019

      You've shown a very good understanding of the situation China faces, jazzed_iceberg and spoken up on what you think the 'real' question is. How far do you think China will be willing to go to protect its pride?

      Reply to this comment
      1. Graveney-logo-250x250.jpg jazzed_iceberg | Graveney School
        Tom @ the BNC's comment 05 Oct 2019

        Judging by its track record, it could be willing to go a lot farther than it currently is doing, but (as mentioned above) that would leave it without one of its most important assets. I suppose another thing they could do would be to try to influence what the leaders of Hong Kong do. Due to the nature of Hong Kong's half-democracy, thirty-five of its seats (the ones chosen from the various business industries) could all be influenced by China. For each of them, they could find a person in the industry who seems to have pro-extradition views, and use their huge net worth to bring that person up and get them into the government. I think that there is a high possibility of that happening, as it would be a non-deadly way to get their way.

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        1. Streatham-Wells-logo-250x250.jpg reserved_cherry | Streatham Wells Primary School
          jazzed_iceberg's comment 07 Oct 2019

          If people tell the government or the leader, wouldn't they get arrested? Because if people tell the government or the leader, they will get arrested and will go to jail. Also, China took away Hong Kong's human rights. Do the people in Hong Kong have human right? Is it ok to be protesting violently?

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