How are robots effecting the world of work?

Featured Image - Future of Work 2

Today, technology is a big part of our daily lives. As time has gone by, tech has been getting more advanced, from communicating online to finding your way around the world. This post will inform you about how robots/technology is affecting the world of work!

How has work been affected?

Careers all around the world has been changed, due to the current affair: Coronavirus. It has been changed in ways, from working in an office to working at home. Large businesses have had to shut down. However, this has given small businesses a huge opportunity to attract more people and make more money from their products. This is just one of the pros that the coronavirus has caused.

Today, technology is a big part of our daily lives. As time has gone by, tech has been getting more advanced, from communicating online to finding your way around the world. This post will inform you about how robots/technology is affecting the world of work!

How has work been affected?

Careers all around the world has been changed, due to the current affair: Coronavirus. It has been changed in ways, from working in an office to working at home. Large businesses have had to shut down. However, this has given small businesses a huge opportunity to attract more people and make more money from their products. This is just one of the pros that the coronavirus has caused.

Pros and cons of the Coronavirus!

Cons:

Staying at home

Mental health

Shutting down work

Concentration

Not seeing friends or relatives

Pros:

Spending time with family

More spare time

Less stress

Relaxing more

What j0bs have already been taken over by robots?

Switch-Board operator-

It was a job ceated by a technology revolution, but the days of manual telephone switchboards are long gone. In the olden days, a switchboard operator would have to physically connect calls by inserting phone plugs into the relevant jacks. They would also be able to participate in the call. In the largest exchanges, supervisors whizzed around on roller skates to keep up with all their staff. Switchboard operators still exist within organizations today, although the systems are completely computerized.

Bowling alley pinsetter-

We often take for granted the fact that all bowling alleys have machines to pick up our fallen pins and rearrange them - as well as computers keeping a tally of our scores on a screen. In earlier times, a bowling alley pinsetter would be waiting at the end to pick up all the knocked-down pins and put them back in place. It could be a dangerous job if the players were not paying attention

Lift operator-

Everyone who has used a lift knows that it is not difficult – press a button and you’re on your way. But the first lifts could not automatically stop perfectly on the level you wanted. Instead, they were manually controlled by a large lever, and a lift operator would have to judge when to stop the lift as well as opening and locking the doors. The technology on board today’s user-operated lifts now does all that for you. You'll still find lift operators in a few luxury hotels where the clients are too rich to press buttons for themselves! - and in the BT Tower in London, where the lift travels so fast to the 34th floor viewing area that some passengers need to be reassured.

Knocker-Upper-

How did people get up in the morning before alarm clocks existed? Up until around the 1920s, those who had to wake early relied on a knocker-upper (or knock-up) who would use a truncheon or long stick to hit your window until you woke up! Since then we’ve moved onto wind-up clocks, before shifting again to digital alarm clocks and swapping alarm clocks completely for our smart phones. But here's a question: who knocked up the knocker-uppers?

Check out cashier-

“Do you need any bags today?” the cashier usually asks. But perhaps not for long. Self-service checkouts are found in nearly every supermarket in the UK now, and it only takes one or two operators to manage a dozen checkouts or more.

Self-checkouts aren’t confined to small basket shopsmost supermarkets have full self-service checkouts with conveyor belts, while others let you scan as you shop using a handheld scanner. Now one person can monitor a dozen self-checkouts, to correct the mistakes we make as customers.

What is the most important part of the job?- our opinion

Most people living around the world have mentioned that they think money or being happy when working is the most important part of a job. Whereas, me and Involved_Grapefruit believe that both of these are equally important. We believe that money is important, this is because, to eat, buy a house, make a living, provide for yourself and family cost money.We also think that being happy at work is important because, if your not happy where you work, you aren't doing as well as you could. This could result to you being fired, or/and more.

Working from home pros and cons

Pros:

  • Zoom calls
  • More peaceful
  • Less stress

Cons:

  • Zoom calls
  • Loneliness
  • Bad internet connection
  • Battery limitation

This post was made by Upbeat_Acorn and Involved_Grapefruit (This has also been uploaded to their account aswell!)

Thank you for reading.

Comments (1)

  • unnamed (2).jpg EXPERT: Malindi Myers, Economist @ Bank of England
    07 Dec 2020

    This is a really interesting question, and one that economists, philosophers, politicians, etc. have thought about for centuries. With each major economic revolution - agriculture, industrial and, now, digital - there have been concerns about the impact on people's jobs. While some people's jobs are certainly affected, other opportunties are presented, and in general economies, communities and people have managed to move forward in terms of living standards depsite these major economic upheavals. But here's the question - if the economy changes in major structural ways - existing sectors may become less significant and new sectors emerge and grow, how do we as people, workers, consumers, etc. adapt? Skills, education, innovation, creativity are often the route forward. But it can be hard work to stay ahead of the innovation and economci development curve, although it can be exiciting, interesting, engaging and challenging too. where would you prefer to be on the economic development and innovation timeline/curve? Would you prefer to keep things as they are or be part of that changing, growing journey? As young people, with energetic, creative minds, you are at the front of that curve. What do you think/feel about that?

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