How Our Parent’s Votes Impact Our Opinions?

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The overall outcome of the 2016 EU referendum was to Brexit with 51.9% of the vote, so I am very interested to know how our parents voted and if it reflects our own opinions. Lets face it, we were all very young during that time and if we were honest we didn’t really understand fully what Brexit meant. Being so young most of our opinions were possibly shaped by our parents. So nearly three years on, are BNC member’s opinions about Brexit similar or different to our parents?

I also feel it’s important to get some understanding of what are the real concerns of those that voted Brexit and what were the issues that persuaded them to do so. Is Brexit still considered a positive thing? It’s also important to hear the other side of the parents that voted to Remain, what were their reasons and what are the concerns now.

Brexit has clearly divided Britain, I feel if we don't face up to the issues of why they voted the way they did, we'll never bring the nation closer together. It’s so complicated, that we need to be clearer of the implications of Britain leaving the EU, especially if there’s a chance of another referendum. According to a CSI Brexit report, The two main reasons people voted Leave were 'immigration' and 'sovereignty', whereas the 2 main reason people voted Remain was 'the economy'. and ‘jobs’. ‘

To back the Immigration argument, I was startled by a published survey back in 2014 from fullfacts.org ‘three quarters of people say immigration should be reduced and a majority have opposed immigration for over half a century’. In my opinion, three quarters is quite a lot of people. Should our government have done more to listen to the people’s concerns and reduce the immigration numbers?

According to fullfacts.org, although being in the EU, the UK had no control over the numbers of EU citizens coming into UK due to free movement, however, about half of immigration into the UK are from non-EU countries and this is the area where our own government can have control over who we decide to let in. I’m not even sure how much of this knowledge is known to people, if they did, perhaps putting pressure towards our own government to admit fewer non EU migrants could have drastically lowered the overall immigration numbers. Could that have been enough to appease the British people?

A decade of government austerity, was this a possible reason? I even know a family who voted Brexit to make a ‘Protest Vote’. Perhaps, not a majority views of Brexiteers if you go by the CSI Brexit report. However, I do wonder whether some of the issues that some people felt angry about might have been misdirected to the EU rather than towards our own government? Or perhaps, Brexiteers have a perfectly strong, valid reason to vote Leave.

So to explore and discuss this further, my questions are, did your parents vote Brexit, Remain, or just simply didn’t vote? And what were their reasons?

Do you also agree with your parents?

I also have some other thoughts you might want to to ponder. They say that, now people have more information about what Brexit might mean for the UK, there should be another vote. Do you agree?

Others say the result of the 2016 referendum should be respected and that voters have had their final say. What do you think?

https://fullfact.org/immigration/public-attitudes-towards-immigration/https://fullfact.org/europe/immigration-eu-referendum/\https://ukandeu.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/CSI-Brexit-4-People%E2%80%99s-Stated-Reasons-for-Voting-Leave.pdf

Comments (3)

  • Olivia-Avatar.jpg Olivia @ the BNC
    04 Mar 2019

    I have given you a star as this post shows great curiosity. Well done for researching further (and providing your sources!) as well as asking questions about what you have found.

    It would be really interesting to hear what other people think about the way their parents voted in the referendum; do you agree with their vote and their reasons for it? Remember that people don't have to tell you which way they voted.

    Reply to this comment
  • The-Ruth-Gorse-logo-250x250.jpg creative_sparrow | The Ruth Gorse Academy
    05 Mar 2019

    Hi Olivia,
    Thank you for the star. Yes, I forgot to mention my parents voted to remain, and they never doubted that being part of the EU is the best thing for Great Britain and how they see it, the alternative will be devastating. However within this post I’m trying to be open-minded as much as I can and I’m trying to understand more on why Brexiteers voted the way they did. But so far, I’ve yet to hear a convincing argument that says Brexit will benefit the country as a whole. So I welcome anybody that will look at the evidence and show me that Brexit has many more positives that far outweigh the negatives.

    Not a day goes by where we hear negative Brexit news stories, and it’s not scaremongering, If you want a long list of companies that have left or are planning to leave Britain including the job losses, the evidence is there. Even the Brexit supporter Mr Dyson has gone to Singapore. The NHS is screaming at Theresa May that she’s handling it wrong. Businesses are collapsing due to the uncertainty. Looking at this, I can’t see how Britain is going to have a surviving economy, let alone a thriving one.

    There are so many more positive reasons why we should stay in the EU that rarely get a mention. The UK share so many joint projects with the EU, such as the shared security and intelligence data and the agencies which operate to keep the whole of the EU safe. There are medical research groups within the EU which benefit patients being treated in the NHS, we also have scientific collaborations such as the CERN project (Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire ) - the Large Hadron Collider and the Galileo navigation system which the UK have invested £1.2billion on. But because of Brexit there are concerns we may not have access to it. New scientific progress usually leads to new technology- and new technology usually creates a thriving economy.

    EU migrants benefit Britain. There are currently 63,000 NHS staff in England that are EU nationals. The doctors and nurses are highly skilled possibly more so than recruits from other not so developed countries. There is currently a massive shortage of NHS staff. Applications from the EU have dramatically dropped, and most have contemplated on leaving. There are already warnings of firms struggling to recruit EU migrants especially within the hospitality sector.

    Britain’s place in the world would be stronger, have greater workers’ rights, job opportunities and a stronger economy if we stay in the EU. Not only that, the collaboration and the access to shared knowledge only advances a nation, whilst being an isolated nation can only regress a nation.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11689202/NHS-spends-huge-sums-on-foreign-nurses-yet-two-thirds-of-local-applicants-are-rejected.html

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  • Beverley-St-Nicholas-logo-250x250.jpg wonderful_argument | Beverley St Nicholas Primary School
    07 Mar 2019

    our parents decide what we should do because they want us to be like them and make the same decisions of them!

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