Brexit: how will it affect young people?

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Brexit has been a huge issue that has been all over the news and is set to take place on 29th March 2019 unless the EU agree to an extension. However, a large majority of people are very unhappy about this event, despite having voted for the UK to leave the EU during the 2016 referendum.

This got me thinking about one group of people who didn't have the opportunity to vote. Young people- for example, people of my age. We are too young to vote and have our say, even when such a big change could affect our lives a great deal. From the statistics I have seen, the younger you are the more likely you were to vote to stay in the EU (studies suggest just over 70% of 18-24 year-olds voted Remain, while just under 30% opted to vote Leave). If more young people were allowed to vote, the outcome could have been very different...

I did some research into the effect Brexit might have on the lives on the younger generation and stumbled upon some shocking possibilities:

There's no doubt about it- Brexit is expensive, however it happens. Aside from this, it is taking up so much of the government's time to sort out, that they may end up neglecting things like affordable housing for young people and young people's earnings. It's already difficult enough to buy your own property- won't this make things even worse? One article I read suggested that young people could lose up to £180,000 in salary by 2050 if we end up with a no deal Brexit. That's even worse that I could ever imagine!

2. Travel and freedom of movement is also a massive issue for young people. Over the past ten years there has been a 50% increase in students going abroad to study. This could become an impossibility for my generation, which seems extremely unfair. Brexit would mean fewer opportunities to live in multicultural communities, to study abroad cheaply and to work with colleagues from all over Europe.

Lots of people in the UK come from backgrounds of multiple heritages where one parents is from the UK and the other from another European country. This has never posed a problem before, but now these people may find themselves having to apply for UK nationality. This might harm their sense of identity, as it is making them choose between being British or European rather than giving them the option of both.

The UK might become less tolerant and more racist. I love living in such a multicultural community, where all races and religions are appreciated and celebrated. There has already been an increase in hate crime since Brexit was announced, and it's scary to think this could get even worse.

In conclusion, I think it is incredibly unfair that the people who are set to be affected most by Brexit are the people who were not allowed to vote.

What do you think? Will anything else change for younger people? Is there anything in particular that worries you?

References:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/article/b8d097b0-3ad4-4dd9-aa25-af6374292de0

http://www.lse.ac.uk/media-and-communications/assets/documents/research/A-Better-Brexit-for-Young-People.pdf

Comments (14)

  • Tiff-Avatar.jpg Tiff @ the BNC
    15 Mar 2019

    What a fantastic post! You've developed your reasoning. Can you be open-minded and consider a rebuttal (something to disagree with your points) someone might give to one of your points? You could then consider how you would respond.

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  • Birchwood-logo-250x250.jpg efficient_eagle | Birchwood C of E Primary School
    17 Mar 2019

    Brexit is a vote if you want to live or stay it started at 2016 .It was also named as democracy

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  • Portobello-logo-250x250.jpg honorable_penguin | Portobello High School
    18 Mar 2019

    This is our future and I think we should either have a say or it shouldn’t happen. People in my school went to protest outside the parliament (against climate change) and that just goes to show that we do care and we do want to have a say.

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  • Streatham-Wells-logo-250x250.jpg charismatic_chameleon | Streatham Wells Primary School A
    20 Mar 2019

    Some people don't realise that we are depending on them to make a very important desicion for mostly our generation, not just theirs. Whatever they decide, if it goes wrong, they will just drop the problem on us and we will have to deal with what they caused. They should consider their children's thoughts into the vote and realise that they will change our future for good or for worse. They might leave a mess our generation will have to mop up. That is why young people (who the vote will actually effect) should have a say in brexit. We just have to trust that the adults and goverment will make the right choice that will not harm our future. This is a very tricky thing so, right now, we will just have to wait and see what happens.

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  • Richmond-Hill-logo-250x250.jpg outstanding_passionfruit | Richmond Hill Academy
    21 Mar 2019

    What happens if you have just left to go study in a different country but the effect of brexit doesn't let you go and you spent £2000 on the trip do you get the money back or not?

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    1. Tiff-Avatar.jpg Tiff @ the BNC
      outstanding_passionfruit's comment 08 Apr 2019

      What might be the consequences of this?

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  • Portobello-logo-250x250.jpg honorable_bilberry | Portobello High School
    22 Mar 2019

    It’s are future so we should get a say on what is going to happen and adults shoulden’t vote for us we should get a say as well

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  • John-Ray-logo-250x250.jpg funny_emotion | John Ray Junior School
    22 Mar 2019

    What is the point of brexit

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  • St-Gregorys-logo-250x250.jpg courageous_crab | St Gregory's Catholic Primary School C
    22 Mar 2019

    It will effect young people ,young children won`t have a lot of freedom as we do now and plus we have already voted on weather we should leave the Eurpion union

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  • St-Gregorys-logo-250x250.jpg lively_reindeer | St Gregory's Catholic Primary School C
    22 Mar 2019

    Some things don't rely get how important it is to support children need it for our help.

    Reply to this comment
  • Streatham-Wells-logo-250x250.jpg easygoing_cliff | Streatham Wells Primary School A
    25 Mar 2019

    i think that us children should be able to vote because this will effect our future

    Reply to this comment
  • The-Ruth-Gorse-logo-250x250.jpg creative_sparrow | The Ruth Gorse Academy
    02 Apr 2019

    Brexit: How will it effect young people

    Hi fearless_wolverine, I think your post highlighted a lot of concerns for many young people like us. Our concerns are heightened even more because we are so heavily focused on this topic right now.

    Just like you, I love living in a multicultural society, most young people like us have friendship groups which include a diverse mix of nationalities and this is why young people today are probably the most tolerant groups of people of all generations. I do worry for my European friends and how their rights to stay will affect them and especially if they were made to feel unwelcome. I agree a certain level of racism has increased which have been attributed to Brexit. This however, have made all Leavers unfairly tagged together as racist and labeled as such and so some do feel uncomfortable with this stigma as I have seen from a Guardian clip.

    I see Great Britain as a multicultural nation, however a few people do have a fixed idea of what a British person ‘looks’ like and may add to some intolerance within our society. Take me for example, I’m from a mixed heritage, my maternal grandparents originate from Hong Kong, my father is white British and my mother who was born in the UK always sees herself as British. Still, this doesn't stop people asking me ‘where am I from?’ even when I say I’m British-born in the UK, they have a hard time accepting this fact.

    Brexit will affect the younger generation to come so it really is important to know why people voted the way they did. So I discovered recently that many of my relatives voted to Leave, it was shocking to know that a few of them in their 40‘s had never ever voted in their entire life other than the Brexit vote! And, admittedly it was more of a protest vote for them. One of my aunties is a nurse and she voted to Leave due to her beliefs that the NHS is overstretched. Her partner’s parents also voted to leave, one of them being a GP. So we can perhaps demystify some of the ideas that ‘all’ leave voters were ‘uneducated’ people. In public, on radio stations and TV discussions, Leavers will proclaim that the UK is controlled by the EU and that the UK should make its own laws, in contrary to the views of the Remainers; they believe the UK and the EU are a collaborative union and together they make the laws as a consensus. However, I was surprised to learn that before Brexit was ever a thing, some of my parent's families and friends had admitted that the EU was never a thought that had ever entered into their minds and it certainly didn’t enter in our family discussion either. But perhaps not so for the older generations, most of them would have memories of the UK joining the EU in 1973 and would have their own set of pros and cons. With all this in mind though, this does lead me to wonder, exactly how much of the Leave votes was influenced by the media, was it really about the EU and their ‘control’ over the UK and how much of the votes was about the discontent of our own government?


    Brexit or no Brexit. at the end of the day we all want to live in a harmonious society and to get along and not have this division running through our lives. But, how do we achieve it? I personally believe, Brexit have exposed some deep seated frustration and anger on so many issues other than the EU, I think when Brexit is through, one way or another, the government must redirect all their attention to address those immediate concerns that have been neglected. I think if we don’t tackle the housing shortages, Knife crime, NHS, Welfare States, Schools etc then hostility will persist long after Brexit is done. Immigration, as we all know now, was a factor for leavers believing the rise of migrants was the cause of all the other problems today. The remainers on the other hand lay the blame entirely on the Tory’s austerity measures. Either way, it did play a part in why we have Brexit. So in order to appease the leavers should the government reduce the immigration levels? It probably will be hard to do even after Brexit, we have a huge shortage of workers in certain sector. Currently the EU migrants have fallen so the government will rely on non-EU migrants to fill those gaps. Perhaps the only way to make everyone happy is a carefully, managed immigration policy at a steady pace so racial tension does not rise as we have seen throughout Brexit. A sudden surge of migrants may cause hostility and resentment to rise from sections of society especially if that community is already struggling. To prevent this from happening the government just need tackle all the other problems first. Cast our thoughts to the horrendous New Zealand mosque shooting - such an extreme racial hatred for others I find so hard to believe on such a peaceful nation. The government cannot afford to ignore the people, they need to start caring for our society and solve the problems once and for all because nobody wants to live in an unhappy, angry country.

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    1. Tiff-Avatar.jpg Tiff @ the BNC
      creative_sparrow's comment 03 Apr 2019

      What a fantastic comment, drawing on your own experiences and examples from what you've read and seen elsewhere.

      If the Brexit issue has exposed underlying tensions in the nation, does that mean is has been a good thing?

      Reply to this comment
      1. The-Ruth-Gorse-logo-250x250.jpg creative_sparrow | The Ruth Gorse Academy
        Tiff @ the BNC's comment 05 Apr 2019

        Hi Tiff,
        Yes I do think it’s a very good thing if Brexit has highlighted some real underlying tensions. According to the Joseph Rountree Foundation, over 14 million people (about one in five of the UK population) are in poverty. Therefore the government should urgently focus their attention to do everything possible to protect the UK's poorest families and all the other struggles within it’s communities, especially as we have so much uncertainty that lies ahead. Even though there were wealthy people voting to leave, there was still a high percentage of ‘leavers’ that came from deprived communities. Many will believe that leaving the EU will give the UK more money and power to build a prosperous country without the ‘control’ of the EU. So even for those that lay the blame on our government because of all the austerity measures, the nation will still expect a lot from our government post Brexit to deliver on those promises to tackle all these big concerning issues.

        After seeing and listening to so many clips, my overwhelming message I take from the vote for Brexit is that people in large parts of England and Wales are feeling excluded and left behind. They are tired of being ignored. Wales, who largely voted to leave, even though it’s gets large amounts of the EU funding, will be expecting the government to support them once the EU funding starts to fade. One town that echoes this feeling is Grimsby. It’s an area that overwhelmingly voted to leave with 69.9%. In February, Theresa May went to Grimsby to give a Key Speech, she acknowledged that northern towns like Grimsby have been largely neglected for far too long and promised the people she would do more to help. I’m not too sure they are too convinced though. Grimsby was once a thriving fishing Industry but has declined over the years and there are certainly a lot of frustrated Grimsby folks. These are some of their thoughts:

        "So to come here and try and, what in my opinion, is cheap political posturing, I don't think it's going to make a difference."

        “How is this going to improve the industrial north? Quite frankly we are treated like one of the last frontiers, probably how the colonies were treated 200 years ago. We seem to be largely forgotten about.”

        “You’ve had three years, people are fed up with it, they’re fed up with this austerity and it’s time the Government sorted issues out and not just pass them on.

        I think the government will have to do a lot to prove Brexit was worth it. If we truly want Great Britain to thrive independently and unify our divided country, then they have to do more to bridge the gap between the prosperous and the poor. If the UK seriously wants to tell the world it did a right thing by leaving the EU, then they have to stand by their promise and act quickly and fix our broken country. I think this will go some way towards healing and patching up our warring nation.

        Young people voted overwhelmingly to remain and we are the future of this country. If Brexit turns out to be one big failure, there is a chance, with the power of democracy, to vote to rejoin the EU in 10 or 20 years time. But this will probably happen at a cost; we will never be able to have the bespoked EU deal we currently have which the UK worked hard to negotiate for, such as the rebate and the opt-outs of not wanting to adopt the Euro currency, or be part of the Shengan area which allowed us to control our own borders.

        If the government fails to meet the high expectations of a better life after Brexit, they would risk alienating people even further, and would result in millions of people becoming even more divided than ever before. It is close to three years on from the vote, it’s not right that people should struggle on within their communities. Many issues can only be solved unless the government gets a firm grip to tackle the issues and invest in the communities not just focus their concerns over trade deals or building the £55 billion HS2.


        https://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/news/grimsby-news/theresa-may-grimsby-withdrawal-agreement-2626690
        https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-38762034

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